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Urwaruka Rushasha (New Generation): Improving the well-being of vulnerable girls and boys in Burundi Image

Promoting Inclusive Markets and Financial Systems

Urwaruka Rushasha (New Generation): Improving the well-being of vulnerable girls and boys in Burundi

Urwaruka Rushasha (New Generation): Improving the well-being of vulnerable girls and boys in Burundi

Summary

In line with its commitment to implementing programs that are both evidence- based and evidence generating, the IRC is carrying out a rigorous impact evaluation with a randomized control trial1 to assess the impact of VSLA activities and the added impact of the Healing Families and Communities discussion series on:

  • Spending on children’s education, health, nutrition and clothing;
  • Children’s education, health, nutrition and wellbeing;
  • Parents attitudes towards discipline and their ability to protect their children from violence, abuse and exploitation; and 
  • Children’s participation.

The impact evaluation has four primary components: a baseline assessment, program monitoring through quarterly quantitative surveys, a midterm impact evaluation, and a final impact evaluation. In each phase of the evaluation process, data is collected from children (with parental consent) and adults using quantitative surveys. The children’s questionnaire includes questions about:

  • Education,
  • Labor,
  • Parental treatment and punishment,
  • Family functioning, and
  • Psychosocial wellbeing.

The results of the first quarterly monitoring survey reveal that after just three months, the “Urwaruka Rushasha” (New Generation) project is already having a positive impact on lives of children:

  • The percentage of all respondents who reported having yelled or screamed at their child in the month preceding the survey decreased from 64.2% to 55.6%.
  • The percentage of all respondents who reported having shaken their child during the last month decreased from 28.4% to 8.6%.
  • The percentage of respondents who reported having hit or slapped their child with their bare hand dropped from 25.9% to 16 %.
  • Respondents in both VSLA and VSLA+ groups reported a statistically significant increase in the wellbeing of their children. 


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