[x] Close

Download Link

Keep up with SEEP!

Sign up for our email list and you'll be the first to know about latest news, blog posts, events & new worldwide initiatives from SEEP and its members

Minimum Economic Recovery Standards Image

Promoting Inclusive Markets and Financial Systems

Minimum Economic Recovery Standards

Minimum Economic Recovery Standards

Summary

The Minimum Economic Recovery Standards articulate the minimum level of technical and other assistance to be provided in promoting the recovery of economies and livelihoods affected by crisis. This book uses the same structure developed by Sphere (as described in the Handbook) for its standards, namely, key actions, key indicators, and guidance notes.The Sphere Project

The Minimum Economic Recovery Standards have been accepted as a companion standard to the Sphere Handbook 2011 Edition, which is produced by the Sphere Project and seeks to set minimum standards for humanitarian action.  

From the Introduction

Increasingly, practitioners and donors who respond to disasters are recognizing the need for rapid, tailored support for the livelihoods, enterprises, and economies affected in the wake of a crisis. This is often done in parallel with emergency efforts to meet basic human needs for shelter, water, food, and health services. In the past, economic recovery assistance had been viewed as a later-stage activity. However, disasters—such as the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the prolonged conflicts in the Middle East and South Asia, and the 2010 Haiti earthquake—illustrate that an economy continues to function during a crisis, albeit at a reduced or shrinking rate of growth. Affected populations require sources of income, at a minimum to survive and at best to thrive once again.

Focus of the Minimum Economic Recovery Standards

The programmatic focus of the Minimum Economic Recovery Standards is on strategies and interventions designed to improve income, cash flow, asset management, and growth among crisis-affected households and enterprises. These include four distinct technical program areas: financial services, productive assets, employment, and enterprise development. It emphasizes encouraging the re-start of enterprises and livelihoods strategies, and improving market productivity and governance.

Contact

For more information on this resource, contact Nisha Singh, Director of the Financial Services Community of Practice at the SEEP Network.



Get our e-newsletter The Monthly Networker & you'll be the first to know about latest news, blog posts, events & new worldwide initiatives.
Like Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter RSS Feed
© Copyright 2016 SEEP Network. All Rights Reserved