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Delivery Channels

Market Research Findings

In examining the most effective ways to reach youth, it is important to identify the following:
• Typical activities
• Gathering places
• Types of groups or clubs to which they belong
• Places where they access information
• Who they trust
• Convenient times for reaching them
• How they like to learn

Typical Activities

A day in the life of a young person may include school, homework, housework and/or chores, playing with friends (e.g., entertainment, sports), and part-time labor (e.g., in the market or agriculture, depending on where they live).

Gathering Places

Youth gather at home, school, recreation or community centers, cafes (to access entertainment or the Internet), church, workplaces, cinemas or movie theaters, and town squares (AIM Youth–Mali, Safe Spaces–Kenya). In some regions, the most important factors that influence where young people spend time are feeling safe and comfortable and the availability of entertainment (ESAF–West Bank/Gaza).
Schools are the main gathering place for in-school and rural youth. In rural areas, schools host various sporting, cultural, and social events, and may be a gathering place for the entire community (AIM Youth–Ecuador).

Types of Groups or Clubs
Some youth participate in age-based associations that help develop the community and/or provide mutual help and social support by raising funds for religious and social events. They may also undertake collective work, such as agriculture. These associations are especially common in rural areas (AIM Youth-Senegal, AIM Youth-Mali). Some youth are also involved in informal savings and credit groups.
Places where young people gather information/who they trust

Most youth access information by watching or listening to their parents, especially their mothers (YouthSave, Savings Innovation and Expansion for Adolescent Girls and Young Women–Dominican Republic). Youth save money with their parents, other relatives (especially grandmothers), shopkeepers, and teachers, indicating their main sources of trust, influence, and information. Other sources of information include savings groups, peers, staff of NGOs and churches, and community leaders (YouthSave, YouthInvest, AGEP–Zambia).

Youth also access information through a variety of media, such as television, radio, mobile phones, and the Internet (ESAF- West Bank/Gaza, InterMedia/AudienceScapes, Savings Innovation and Expansion for Adolescent Girls and Young Women- Dominican Republic). In Mongolia, mobile phones are the main communication tool for girls (Savings Innovation and Expansion for Adolescent Girls and Young Women- Mongolia). In other regions, youth are open to recieving mobile based communications, especially those in rural areas (ESAF-West Bank/Gaza).

Young people's sources of information may vary by geographic location. For example, in Kenya radio is the best way to reach youth in rural areas and TV, the best way to reach youth in urban areas (InterMedia/AudienceScapes- Ghana). In Ghana, youth receive information about formal financial services through radio and TV, and about informal financial services through word of mouth from family or friends (InterMedia/AudienceScapes-Ghana). 

Convenient times

The best times to reach young people may vary by geographic location, enrollment status, or age. For example, women may prefer morning/daytime classes due to safety issues associated with going out alone in the evening. In addition, parents will not permit them to venture out at that time (YouthInvest–Morocco, Safe Spaces–Kenya).

Older at-work or in-school youth (i.e., those who pursue vocational training) may prefer the evening (YouthInvest-Morocco), while younger in-school youth may only be able to meet after school and during weekends (Savings Innovation and Expansion for Adolescent Girls and Young Women- Dominican Republic). 

Rural youth involved in agricultural activities may be more available during the rainy season (June to September) because they are otherwise either on vacation from school or helping their parents in the fields. During the dry season, in-school youth are in school and working youth may migrate to the city, making it more difficult to meet them (AIM Youth-Mali). 

How Youth Like to Learn
Most youth who are in school prefer a classrom setting where they can engage with their peers and facilitators, interact with a group, ask questions, and receive answers (YouthInvest-Morocco, Savings Innovation and Expansion for Adolescent Girls and Young Women- Dominican Republic). They prefer learning about financial services in the structured environment of school, where they spend the majority of their time (ESAF-West Bank/Gaza).
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